Habitat types key navigation

You can use the 'key navigation' function to identify a specific habitat by answering a set of questions. Starting from first question to next questions you select one of the possible answers. Here are samples of possible answers:
  • No ( 002 ) - Leading to question named '002'
  • Yes [ G ] - Leading to another questions subset of level G
  • No Factsheet icon[ E6 ] - Links directly to factsheet for E6
Additionally the diagram may be used for reference.


Category : (G )Woodland, forest and other wooded land
Diagram : Diagram icon


Question i :   Woodland type
   ''Forest'' habitats are separated from other wooded habitats. ''Forest'' habitats are defined as: natural stands of area greater than 0.5 ha and crown cover greater than 10% and tree height greater than 5 m; natural stands of area less than 0.5 ha and crown cover greater than 10% and tree height greater than 5 m with more or less natural ground flora (i.e. not heavily influenced by man through management or damage); plantations of area greater than 0.5 ha and crown cover greater than 10% and tree height greater than 5 m. Other wooded land includes: natural stands of area less than 0.5 ha and crown cover greater than 10% and tree height greater than 5 m heavily influenced by man through management or damage (small, intensively managed woods and small woods strongly influenced by anthropogenic activities); young natural stands with trees of height less than 5 m and potential crown cover of greater than 10%; plantations of young trees with potential crown cover of greater than 10% and tree height less than 5 m; plantations of area less than approximately 0.5 ha with potential crown cover of greater than 10% and tree height greater than 5 m; areas normally part of the forest area but temporarily unstocked as a result of human intervention or natural causes; coppice; narrow lines of mature trees, such as avenues and windbreaks. Note that Dwarf trees at the arctic and alpine tree limit (i.e. krummholz under conditions where mature individuals are less than 3 m high) are included in F, Heathland scrub and tundra. Note that areas of grassland with trees where the crown cover is 5 -10 % are categorised under E7.
Answers:
'forest' (Question ii ) other Factsheet icon [ This answer goes to category G5 G5 ]


Question ii :   Characterising tree types
   Forest is characterised by the dominant tree types, which may be mixtures of species within the categories broadleaved deciduous; mixed broadleaved and coniferous; broadleaved evergreen; and coniferous. Note that broadleaved woodland is defined as wooded land on which more than 75% of the tree crown cover consists of broadleaved species and that coniferous woodland is defined as wooded land on which more than 75% of the tree crown cover consists of coniferous species (based on FAO definition). Mixed woodland is defined as wooded land on which neither coniferous, nor broadleaved species account for more than 75% of the crown cover.
Answers:
broadleaved deciduous Factsheet icon [ This answer goes to category G1 G1 ] mixed Factsheet icon [ This answer goes to category G4 G4 ] broadleaved evergreen Factsheet icon [ This answer goes to category G2 G2 ] coniferous Factsheet icon [ This answer goes to category G3 G3 ]

European Environment Agency (EEA)
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