Habitat types key navigation

You can use the 'key navigation' function to identify a specific habitat by answering a set of questions. Starting from first question to next questions you select one of the possible answers. Here are samples of possible answers:
  • No ( 002 ) - Leading to question named '002'
  • Yes [ G ] - Leading to another questions subset of level G
  • No Factsheet icon[ E6 ] - Links directly to factsheet for E6
Additionally the diagram may be used for reference.


Category : (E4 )Alpine and subalpine grasslands
Diagram : Diagram icon


Question e20 :   Late-lying snow?
   Grassland habitats of areas that retain late-lying snow (i.e. areas retaining snow for longer than usual for that latitude and altitude) are separated (path = Yes). Note that permanently snow or ice covered habitats are categorised under H4. Note also that snow patch habitats are treated as complex X05 comprising units of E4.1 and F2.1.
Answers:
Yes Factsheet icon [ E4.1 ] No (Question e21 )


Question e21 :   Moss and lichen dominated?
   Relatively snow-free exposed summits, slopes and ridges dominated by mosses and lichens are separated (path = Yes).
Answers:
Yes Factsheet icon [ E4.2 ] No (Question e22 )


Question e22 :   Enriched?
   Enriched (fertilised or manured) alpine and sub-alpine grassland habitats are separated (path = Yes). Note that manuring can be by concentrations of grazing animals.
Answers:
Yes Factsheet icon [ E4.5 ] No (Question e23 )


Question e23 :   Soil type
   Acid alpine grasslands are distinguished from alpine grassland habitats on base-rich soils.
Answers:
acid Factsheet icon [ E4.3 ] base-rich Factsheet icon [ E4.4 ]

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